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Atom Sapienza
 Politecnico Torino 120
SNS
Unipalermo
 UNIMORE modificato

BO PR VR UD QUADRATO finale
distretto micronano
Agenzia Spaziale Italiana
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IIT
FEDERCHIMICA NEW
Assing 2017
Lfoundry Nuovo 02
ZEISS
Dhitech
DSCTM
dsftm
ENEA pulito
INRiM

NANOFASICI

 

 

 

IN COOPERATION WITH

 

 

 

 

Advanced Scanning Probe Microscopies

 

WS.III


Advanced Scanning Probe Microscopies


September 13

 

WORKSHOP COMMITTEE
 
Romolo MARCELLI, CNR IMM
Daniele PASSERI, Sapienza University of Rome
Marco RENZELLI, LFoundry
 

organized by

 

CNR IMM    Sapienza SNN CNIS    SISM Logo

Invented about 40 years ago, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) refers nowadays to a family of techniques which allows the imaging of the sample surface with nanometer lateral resolution and sub-nanometer vertical resolution by combining accurate positioning and scanning systems with the use of a nanosized probe which interacts with the sample surface. Beside the improvement of the quality of topographical reconstructions in terms, for instance, of resolution, stability, or scan rate, SPM has been used as a platform to develop several advanced methods for the characterization of many physical parameters of the sample. Thus, from the original use for topographical imaging, SPM is becoming an indispensable nanometrological tool for mechanical, electric, magnetic, thermal, optical, or chemical nanocharacteriazions. Recent efforts have been aimed at broadening the range of physical properties, investigable samples, imaging environments, as well as to enhance accuracy,  sensitivity, and reliability of the analytical methods. Also, recent developments demonstrated the capability of SPM methods to investigate not only surface but also sub-surface properties. This workshop aims at presenting an overview and a selection of some of the most recent improvements in SPM methods, e.g., atomic force microscopy (AFM) for mechanical, electric, magnetic nanocharacterizations, as well as optical or microwave near field methods. Emphasis will be given to both presenting the techniques and reviewing some of the most interesting fields of application, e.g., from microelectronics to agri-food or biomedicine and nano-bio-technologies.       

 

 13 September

 

 09:00 - 10:30
Keynote Session:
"Scanning Probe Microscopy: Touching and Probing Matter at the Nanoscale"

WS.III.1 - HT.II.B
In collaboration with: ASSING/Bruker
SYNOPSIS
WS.III.1.1
HT.II.B.1

Jason KILLGORE  CV
NIST, USA
Exploring Nanoscale Viscoelasticity with a Surface Coupled
Scanning Probe Microscope

WS.III.1.2
HT.II.B.2

Emmanuel PARIS
Bruker Europe
Advance measurement in Atomic Force Microscopy. What’s the latest in mechanical and electrical AFM characterization?

Chair: Daniele PASSERI, Sapienza University of Rome
10:30 - 11:00 Coffee Break
  11:00 - 12:30
Advanced SPM techniques: methods and applications 1
WS.III.2 - TT.IV.B
In collaboration with: LFoundry
 SYNOPSIS
WS.III.2.1
TT.IV.B.1
In definition
WS.III.2.2
TT.IV.B.2
Livia ANGELONI
University of Delft
Use of Scanning Capacitance Microscopy as a tool for detecting damage to Lightly Doped Drain (LDD) implants in SRAM 
WS.III.2.3
TT.IV.B.3
Stefano VERONESI
CNR NANO
An atomically flat gold film thermometer on mica to study energy (heat) exchange at the nano-scale
WS.III.2.4
TT.IV.B.4
Cristiano ALBONETTI  CV
CNR-ISMN
The growth of organic ultra-thin films on silicon oxides with variable vacancy states: a Scanning Force Microscopy approach
Chair: Marco RENZELLI, LFoundry
12:30 - 14:00 Light Lunch
  14:00 - 15:30
Advanced SPM techniques: methods and applications 2
WS.III.3 - TT.V.B
 
SYNOPSIS
WS.III.3.1
TT.V.B.1
Michele ORTOLANI
Sapienza University of Rome
Light-induced functional conformational changes of bacteriorhodopsin probed by mid-infrared nanospectroscopy
WS.III.3.2
TT.V.B.2
Giuseppe BARILLARO
University of Pisa
Advanced characterization of nanoporous materials for biosensing and nanomedice
WS.III.3.3
TT.V.B.3
Antonietta LA STORIA
CNR Napoli
AFM in food characterization
WS.III.3.4
TT.V.B.4
Leonetta BALDASSARRE
Sapienza University of Rome
Observation of phonon-polaritons on thin flakes of hBN on gold
Chair: Daniele PASSERI, Sapienza University of Rome 
 15:30 - 16:00 Coffee Break
  16:00 - 17:30
Advance in Near Field Probe Microwave and mm-wave Microscopy for Surface and Subsurface Characterization of Materials
WS.III.4 - TT.VI.B
 
In collaboration with:  CNR IMM - Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation - National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
SYNOPSIS
WS.III.4.1
TT.VI.B.1
Sam BERWEGER  CV
National Institute of Standards and Technology - NIST, Boulder, USA
Nanoelectronic Characterization using Microwave Near-Field Microscopy
WS.III.4.2
TT.VI.B.2
Marco FARINA CV
Università Politecnica delle Marche
Application of Scanning Microwave Microscopy to Biological Samples
es
WS.III.4.3
TT.VI.B.3
Giovanni Maria SARDI CV
CNR IMM, Roma
Near-field Microwave Microscopy for Surface and Subsurface Characterization of Materials
WS.III.4.4
TT.VI.B.4
Venkatachalam SUBRAMANIAN CV
Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, India
Feedback control for constant height mode operation in scanning near-field microwave microscopy
Chair: Emanuela PROIETTI, CNR IMM 

 

 

 

NANOINNOVATION'S GOT TALENT


call for young researchers
by BRACCO FOUNDATION

 fondazione Bracco

SCIENTIFIC PATRONAGE

 

IMASS 300

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logo SCI2

INSTITUTIONAL PATRONAGE

 

Ministero della Difesa

 

Regione Lazio

 

CORPORATE PARTNER

 

WARRANT NUOVO

 

INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERS

 

APRE

  ITA BIG

 

Organizing Secretariat

Dr. Cristina Gippa

+ 39 339 771 4107
+ 39 388 1785318

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